Recipes & Tips


Pan-Broiling Beef

From National Cattlemen’s Beef Association | BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

  1. Heat heavy, nonstick skillet 5 minutes over medium heat.
  2. Season beef (directly from the refrigerator), as desired.  Place beef in preheated skillet (do not overcrowd).  Do not add oil or water; do not cover.
  3. Pan-broil according to chart, turning occasionally.  After cooking, season beef with salt, if desired.

 

Beef Cut Weight/Thickness

Approximate Total Cooking Time
(Medium Rare 145 F)
(Medium 160 F)

CHUCK
Chuck Eye steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
9-11 minutes
12-15 minutes
Shoulder Top Blade steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
11-13 minutes
13-17 minutes
Shoulder Top Blade steak (Flat Iron) 8 ounce each 11-14 minutes
Shoulder Center steak (Ranch) 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-11 minutes
12-15 minutes
Shoulder Petite Tender Medallions 1/2 to 3/4 inch 4-6 minutes (use medium-high heat)
Under Blade Center (Denver Cut) steak, boneless 1/2 inch
3/4 inch
1 inch
3-4 minutes (use medium-high heat)
7-10 minutes
11-15 minutes
RIB
Ribeye steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-11 minutes
12-15 minutes
LOIN
Porterhouse/T-Bone steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
10-13 minutes
14-17 minutes
Top Loin (Strip) steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-11 minutes
12-15 minutes
Tenderloin steak 1/2 inch
3/4 inch
1 inch
3-5 minutes (use medium-high heat)
7-10 minutes
10-13 minutes
SIRLOIN
Top Sirloin steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
12-15 minutes
15-18 minutes
Tri-Tip steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
9-12 minutes
13-16 minutes
ROUND recommend cooking round to medium rare (145 F) doneness only
Top Round steak (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
12-15 minutes
15-17 minutes
Eye Round steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-10 minutes
11-13 minutes
Bottom Round steak (Western griller) (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
11-14 minutes
16-22 minutes
Sirloin Tip Center steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
11-13 minutes
14-15 minutes
Sirloin Tip Side steak (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
10-12 minutes
13-15 minutes
OTHER
Ground Beef patties 1/2 inch (4 ounce)
3/4 inch (6 ounce)
10-12 minutes
14-16 minutes
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Grilling Beef

From National Cattlemen’s Beef Association | BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

  1. Prepare grill (charcoal or gas) according to manufacturer’s directions for medium heat.
  2. Season beef (directly from the refrigerator) with herbs or spices, as desired.  Place on cooking grid.
  3. Grill, covered, according to chart (below), turning occasionally.  After cooking, season beef with salt, if desired.

For charcoal grilling, when coals are medium, ash-covered (approximately 30 minutes), spread in single layer and check cooking temperature.  Position cooking grid.  To check temperature, cautiously hold the palm of your hand above the coals at cooking height.  Count the number of seconds you can hold your hand in that position before the heat forces you to pull it away; approximately 4 seconds for medium heat.

For gas grilling, gas grill brands vary greatly and grilling times may need to be adjusted.  Consult owner’s manual for specific grilling information.

Note: chart guidelines were developed using Weber Genesis gas grills.

Trim visible fat before grilling to prevent flare-ups.  If food is grilled over too high heat, the exterior can become overcooked or charred before the interior reaches the desired doneness.  Charring is not recommended.

*Remove from grill when internal temperature(s) reaches 135 degrees Fahrenheit for medium rare; 150 degrees Fahrenheit for medium doneness.  Let stand 5 minutes.

** Remove from grill when internal temperature(s) reaches 140 degrees Fahrenheit for medium rare; 155 degrees Fahrenheit for medium doneness.  Let stand 5 minutes.

Beef Cut Weight/Thickness

 

Charcoal Grilling Gas Grilling
Approx Total Cooking Time for Medium Rare (145F) to Medium (160F) in minutes
Chuck Chuck Eye steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
9-11
12-14
9-12
13-17
Top Blade steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
6-9
9-13
6-9
10-13
Shoulder Top Blade steak
(Flat Iron)
8 ounces each 10-14 12-16
Shoulder steak, boneless (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-12
12-17
9-12
15-19
Shoulder Center steak (Ranch) 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-11
11-14
8-11
12-16
Shoulder Petite Tender 8-12 ounces each* 14-18 14-19
Under Blade Center steak
(Denver Cut)
1/2 inch
3/4 inch
1 inch
4-7
7-10
10-14
5-8
8-11
12-17





Rib Rib steak, small end 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches**
7-10
10-15
19-24
7-10
10-15
20-25
Ribeye steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches**
7-10
10-15
19-24
7-9
9-14
15-19





Loin Porterhouse/T-Bone steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches**
8-11
11-16
19-24
9-13
15-19
20-25
Top Loin (Strip) steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
7-10
11-14
7-10
11-15
Tenderloin steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches**
7-10
10-14
14-18
7-10
11-15
16-20





Sirloin Top Sirloin steak, boneless 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches*
7-11
11-15
22-26
8-13
13-16
24-30
Tri-Tip steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
8-10
10-14
8-10
10-14





Round
Recommend cooking Round cuts to medium rare (145F) doneness only.
 Round Sirloin Tip Center steak 3/4 inch
1 inch
 8-9
11-13
8-11
13-15
Round Sirloin Tip Side steak (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
9-11
12-14
7-9
13-14
Bottom Round steak (Western Griller) (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.25 inches
8-1o
12-15
18-20
11-14
15-17
18-20
Top Round steak (marinate) 3/4 inch
1 inch
1.5 inches
10-11
12-14
20-23
10-11
16-19
20-23
Eye Round steak (marinate) 3/4 inch
1.5 inches
10-12
13-15
10-12
17-19





Plate & Flank Skirt steak (marinate) 1-1.5 pounds
4-6 inch portions
7-12 8-12
Flank steak (marinate) 1.5-2 pounds 11-16 16-21





Other Ground Beef patties
Cook to medium (160F)
1/2 inch
(4 oz each)
3/4 inch
(6 oz each)
8-10

11-15

7-9

13-14

Kabobs, beef only 1 x 1.25 inches
(1 pound)
5-7 7-9

 

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Beef Cooking Methods

From National Cattlemen’s Beef Association | BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

  • Grilling:  Grilling, a form of dry heat cooking, is one of the most exciting and healthy ways to enjoy beef, whether you are cooking on a gas or charcoal grill.
  • Pan-Broiling:  Sometimes called “frying without fat,” pan-broiling (or skillet cooking) is especially handy for quick meals.  It is a fast cooking method for tender cuts of beef.
  • Pan-Frying:  Pan-frying or sauteing is similar to pan-broiling except a small amount of oil is added to the pan when cooking.
  • Stir-Frying:  Use a skillet or wok to quickly cook thin strips of beef in a little bit of oil; add some sauce, vegetables and other ingredients – and you have a hot one-dish meal on the table in minutes.
  • Broiling:  Cooking beef directly under the heat element in your oven, broiling is a fabulous method for getting dinner on the table in a short period of time, without adding fat.
  • Braising:  The final result of this slow cooking method is tender beef that melts in your mouth.  Braising (or pot roasting) is the method of choice for large, less tender, cuts of beef such as a pot roast or Brisket using a small amount of liquid.
  • Stewing:  Stewing, a slow cooking method, tends to use cubes of beef mixed with vegetables and other ingredients with a larger quantity of liquid.
  • Roasting:  Larger or thicker cuts of beef benefit most from roasting in the oven.  Although it requires more time, roasting is the simplest method because it requires little attention.
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Determining Doneness

From National Cattlemen’s Beef Association | BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

Ground Beef

  • Insert an instant-read thermometer into the center or thickest part of a meatloaf or meatball, or horizontally from the side into the center for patties.
  • All cooking times in this brochure are for fresh or thoroughly thawed Ground Beef.  Ground Beef (patties, meatloaves, meatballs) should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit (medium doneness).  Color is not a reliable indicator of Ground Beef doneness.

Roasts

  • Insert an ovenproof meat thermometer prior to roasting (into the thickest part of the roast, not resting in fat or touching bone) and leave in throughout the cooking process.
  • Or, insert an instant-read thermometer toward end of cooking time (as described above) for about 15 seconds.  Remove thermometer; continue cooking, if necessary.

Steaks

  • For steaks (1/2 inch or thicker), insert an instant-read thermometer horizontally from the side, so that it penetrates the thickest part or the center of the steak, not touching bone or fat.
  • After cooking, let steaks stand 3 minutes before serving.
  • Medium Rare = 145 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Medium = 160 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Well Done = 170 degrees Fahrenheit
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Rubs

From the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association | BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com

Rubs are seasoning blends applied to the surface of roasts, steak and burgers.  These quick mixtures add flavor to beef, but do not tenderize.

  • Dry rubs consist of herbs, spices and other dry seasonings.
  • Paste-type rubs, which are perfect for roasts, contain small amounts of wet ingredients, such as oil, crushed garlic or mustard.
  • Rubs can be applied just before cooking or up to 2 hours in advance and refrigerated until cooking time.
  • Simply combine the ingredients and apply evenly to all surfaces.  Cook beef to desired doneness.

Smokey Paprika Rub
– 2 tablespoons smoked or Spanish paprika
– 1.5 teaspoons sugar
– 1.5 teaspoons chili powder
– 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
– 1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper

Espresso Rub
– 2 tablespoons finely ground espresso coffee beans
– 1 tablespoon garlic pepper
– 2 teaspoons brown sugar
– 1 teaspoon ancho chili powder

Lemon-Pepper Rub
– 2.5 teaspoons lemon pepper
– 1.5 teaspoons dried oregano
– 3 large cloves garlic, minced

Ancho-Chocolate Citrus Rub
– 1 tablespoon ground ancho chili powder
– 3 cloves garlic, minced
– 1.5 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
– 1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
– 1 teaspoon freshly grated orange peel
– 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

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